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Jambo Bwana 5: A Week with Elephants


Saturday, June 25
Umani Springs Camp
Chyulu Hills National Park

We wake up at 6:20 a.m., too late to make the early elephant visit – and the only one we miss all week. Happy to report that Billie is feeling better. At breakfast, everyone says that the morning visit had a completely different vibe from yesterday, when the animals were friendly and quiet. The wild elephants in the forest visited the stockade last night, which apparently upset the matriarchs. Two females, Sonje and Murera, have become matrons to Mwashoti, and as soon as they were let out of their enclosures, they bolted to the young one, flaring ears and letting everyone know of their concerns.

The Umani facility is for elephants with special needs. Several, like Mwashoti, have been caught in snares, which limits their ability to stand up. One leg down makes it more difficult, but the Trust is still hopeful these elephants will someday return to the wild. After watching a video of the snare wound that Mwashoti endured just a few short months ago, it is amazing to see that this vicious wound is hardly visible except in a limp by now.

Elephants love their mudbaths.

We’re out for the 11 a.m. feeding and mudbath. Watching the orphans’ enthusiasm is just as exciting as yesterday, and I get that overwhelming feeling of great joy as they begin to accelerate to make it to their bottles of milk and the way they noisily make their way through the five liters and get a second. Though I have seen this before on YouTube and yesterday in the flesh, it’s still something that makes me so infinitely happy. And alternately, very sad since when these guys and girls get back into the wild, they might be hunted for their tusks, which become more prominent each and every day. One of them trumpets just before getting his bottle, and the unthrottled roar pierces the quiet. It is magnificent. (Watch this scene here.)

Researcher Joyce Poole writes of elephant trumpets: “The sound quality is highly variable and might be described as squealing like a pig, screeching, roaring, shouting, yelling, crying, and even crowing like a rooster.” (Carl Safina, Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel, p. 83) This one sounds like the squealing pig. We will hear many of the others throughout the week.

On the way back we pass the cement pond and finally spot the crocodile, a small fellow, who’s sunning himself along the edge. He slides into the murky water before we can get very close, but Angel got a photo that authenticates that it is not a monitor lizard. Our question has been answered over lunch today, the Kenyan version of pizza, with a crisp crust.

Geoffrey and Mondaii are worried about tsetse flies being around in the area of a planned nature walk, which would have gone up another side of the large hill where we went last night for the Sundowner, so that is cancelled, and we all spend some down time in the afternoon. At one point, I’m kinda lethargic in my swing. Idly scanning the mud hole area with binoculars, I spot Julia trying to get cell service. Nodding off, I wake up and, scanning the area again, see the big baboon we keep hearing at exactly the same spot. I wonder, “WTF,” before finding out Julia is now sitting nearby and fine.

Sometimes elephants can just be ... funny!

The 5pm feeding is great fun, and I get some videos of the gang arriving, and spend some time talking with Philip, the head keeper, about the animals here. As several of us are filming a group coming in, a baboon brouhaha takes place in the forest close to us. It’s really loud and sounds vicious and spiteful and nasty. With baboons, we find out, you never really know. As someone mentions, baboons will squabble about anything.

At one point, we allow the ellies to pick up pellets from our open hands, which gives you a sense of the power of the trunk, which has two main lobes, those “fingers” inside. I never tire of watching them incorporate these appendages, which they use much the same way we use hands and arms. Not as efficient, perhaps, but they have learned how to make the most of them. And maybe, they are more efficient than ours.

At the Sundowner everybody talks about their favorite moments of the day while we watch the mongooses and bush babies and the genet grab their snacks in front of the lights. I find out later reading Dame Sheldrick’s book that feeding these animals is a kind of tradition here – they do a similar thing at Ithumba.

Dinner includes some great mushroom cream soup. (A note about Kenyan soups. We are served cream soup every day, generally some kind of veggie turned into cream, and it’s always yummy.) Today’s menu includes pork spareribs and more of those fresh, crispy veggies, as always, exquisitely prepared. We find out there is a national school for safari chefs, which is not so surprising, since safari is a big source of income for the country and its citizens. Afterwards, we are all singing again before we retire, the three songs Mondaii is teaching us, especially “Jambo Bwana.”

The flashlights appear again as we begin to walk to our lodges. It’s so wonderful to be so well taken care of, and we are sad that we must leave Peter and Lefty and the others tomorrow, but happy to continue our journey with Geoffrey and Mondaii in the drivers’ seats of the Land Rovers.

We head for Tsavo East National Park here. Watch videos of our adventures here.

1 comment

1 Jambo Bwana 4: A Week with Elephants — Jukebox in My Head { 06.22.17 at 5:48 am }

[...] elephant adventure continues here. Watch videos of our trip [...]

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