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Jambo Bwana 8: A Week with Elephants


The older, wild elephants kept their distance. Some of these big tuskers were born in the 1960s. Wouldn't you like to get inside one of those brains?

Tuesday, June 28
Ithumba Camp
Tsavo East National Park
Makueni, Kenya

Although it is hardly primitive, the Ithumba Camp is more the experience I had imagined. This is tent living. It’s great to get a hot outdoor shower and then stand in the sun on the stone floor next to a giant scarab art piece and let the sun dry you off. That just doesn’t suck.

We have noticed large anthills behind our tents, but when I go back to investigate, I discover they are actually camouflage for the solar panels that provide each tent with the hot water for those wonderful showers. And, like at Umani Springs, we throw our dirty laundry into the basket, and it comes back washed and folded in the afternoon. Did I say I could get used to this wilderness living?

We are up at five, so we don’t have to rush to make the 6 a.m. feeding. Watch the morning gathering here. The wild elephants aren’t anywhere to be seen when we arrive, and as the orphans are let out, one turns right at the gate, comes right over to me, touches me with its trunk and heads on over to the lucerne. It’s so magical, I can barely believe it. Did that really happen? High-fived by an elephant? Are you kidding? I’m higher and feeling more fortunate than I’ve ever been in my life.

High-fived by an orphan!

After the elephants and keepers head off, Lois has planned a breakfast at the Tiva River, which is about 20 miles south of the camp. The Tiva is one of the main rivers in Kenya and in this area, but it is dry most of the year, as it is today. It runs only for a few weeks, and though it flows toward the sea, like the Colorado River, it never reaches it. Even though it appears to be completely dry, there is lotsa water beneath, which occasionally appears as springs, and we can see instances along the dry bed.

Tiva Riverbed, where we had breakfast this morning.

That groundwater beneath becomes apparent almost immediately. Geoffrey manages to get his Land Rover into the dry bed of the river, but Mondaii’s truck gets stuck right next to it in wet mud. It’s serious enough that we all have to come back in the one Rover while Mondaii waits for somebody from the Trust to send out a tractor to rescue him. Despite the sinkage, we walk upriver, where breakfast is served, so we enjoy our boiled eggs and fruit and cereal sitting on what we think are rocks. When I push down to get up, the “rock” crumbles beneath me. It’s nothing more than sand and dust, the bottom of the riverbed and underwater when the river is full. “All other ground is sinking sand,” as the old Lutheran hymn goes. Pretty cool.

There is plenty of room in the Land Rover for all of us, and we head back to the mud hole and spend a long time there. See a part of our trip here. The wild bulls are over at the waterhole as the truck pulls up noisily and the attendant gets out to fill it up. We watch the red elephants again, putting on their warpaint like Comanches in Oklahoma territory in the 1850s. Watch the red elephants of Tsavo here and here.

The wild bulls are standing at the waterhole as the truck pulls up noisily and the attendant gets out to clean and fill it up. I wind up looking one of the bulls right in the eye for awhile while standing beneath a small tree. Lois comes over and points out that I am standing beneath an amarule tree, the fruit from whence we get Amarula, and a bush elephants will seek out – perhaps they get a Amarule buzz, too. Elephants everywhere, and so comfortable.

The Amarule Tree at the Ithumba waterhole

During our down time, we can sit in the assembly room and watch an array of monkeys, baboons, warthogs, mongooses, ground squirrels, hornbills, parrots and other birds make their way through the waterhole not far from the compound on their way someplace else. A male greater kudu, the distinctly striped antelope of east Africa, spends some time, and I get to see the markings on his back that almost seem like some kind of hieroglyphic. And we get seriously acquainted with the dik dik, the small antelopes that are everywhere. We literally see thousands during our time here; they are as ubiquitous as squirrels. And, we find out, even they are poached and the meat sold in local villages as a delicacy.

A hornbill stops by to peck at the ground and entertain me. They are like robins, almost tame and ubiquitous. Out of nowhere and right in front of us, a hawk swoops in and takes a smaller bird. A few guineafowl shuffle through before a large baboon troupe makes its way noisily to the waterhole, maybe 30 or 40 in all, with little squabbles and fights breaking out among the members all the time. They’ll fight about any little thing.

All in all, I feel better here than any time on the trip, and the simplicity and ease of our days is really easy to fall into. I love the rhythm of getting up early, spending an hour with the elephants, coming back for breakfast and break, returning to the mud hole at 11 am for another hour or so, coming back for lunch and a nap and heading back out at 5pm for another hour or so watching their return before returning for our Sundowner and dinner. Three-four hours a day surrounded by elephants. Who could ask for more? Watch the elephants, including a second baby, in this scene.

This evening the orphans are accompanied by a large group that includes wild elephants and ex-orphans, and there’s a lot of socializing going on. As the orphans make their way through the melee to their respective places, one of the wild elephants, probably an ex-orphan, gets inside one of the pens, and a keeper comes over and quickly extricates him. Watch a video of this here. Once orphans decide to go wild again, they are not allowed to return to the stockade. Another ex-orphan, his temporal lobe streaming liquid, is up around us later, obviously tired and in distress. Benjamin explains that he wants to return and will probably sleep up against the stockade tonight near the orphans. Tough love.

Along with the pellets, the orphans get stacks of acacia branches, from which they extract the bark, a particular delicacy. I spend some time watching and filming one work over her stack of branches, marveling at how she uses his mouth and teeth as well as the trunk to pull the delicate bark from these tiny limbs. Again, that trunk. Amazing how well it works.

Sakuta, a wild ex-orphan, is particularly friendly, and she touches me, grabbing my fingers for just a moment with her trunk, exhaling and leaving hot air and red dirt on my hands. On the way home for our Sundowners, Mondaii drives us down a road that takes us past the cell tower tree, where we can see its red beacon shining as a guidelight into the world, though it never gives us cell service of any kind. Then Mondaii drives us back out to the mud hole, where we find a couple of tardy elephants looking over their shoulders at us as they leave the area.

At sunset, Lois and I are both upstairs, but we’re a tad late for the sunset. It’s no less gorgeous, however. We’re looking down into Tsavo West and beyond to a long line of purple hills to the south and west above the park. I see a large blue prominence lurking above the line that I haven’t seen before. It’s a cone-like structure, with another smaller one to the south. Lois confirms that it is Kilimanjaro. Nice. Amboseli National Park is over there, and the Masai Mara.

Nancy arrives at the second-floor lookout area with another bottle of Amarula, and we refresh our glasses and continue to enjoy our view of the mighty volcano. Dinner is a wonderful chicken curry and rice dish with carrot soup and homemade vanilla ice cream for dessert. We got to talking about the reptilian aliens that reside beneath Denver International Airport when Lois brings up the legend about the hidden city beneath Mt. Shasta in California that houses Lumurians. Life is good!

I think I have mentioned the soups before. We have a bowl at almost every dinner, and all are pureed and served as cream soups. We have all sorts of veggie flavors, and each is really good. I’m not a big soup guy, but I inhaled every bowl I was served in Kenya.

We admire the immensity of the Milky Way without any light interference before we retire for the evening. Later, Lois takes a magnificent photo of our hazy galaxy, hardly visible at home, over our tent. Wow.

Lois Hild took this incredible photo over our tent at Ithumba Camp.

Our elephant journey continues here. Watch more videos here.

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